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Text Alternative: Highlights from NICHD Scientific Vision Meetings

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To view the original video, please go to http://www.nichd.nih.gov/vision/pages/index.aspx.

Video/Graphics Audio
TITLE SLIDE: VISION: NICHD’S SCIENTIFIC VISION: THE NEXT DECADE
HIGHLIGHTS FROM NICHD SCIENTIFIC VISION MEETINGS
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GRAPHIC SLIDE: Opportunity & Innovation
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Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D., University of Pennsylvania Medical Center"
Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D.: I think a visioning process is a wonderful opportunity to see if we can actually pause for a second, find out where we want to go, where we’ve been, and instead of just working on our treadmill and getting the details done, we can actually see what’s the best way to go that will help both researchers and the public alike.
John Chae, M.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "John Chae, M.D., Case Western Reserve University"
John Chae, M.D.: My interest goes far beyond my own research arena. Actually, my interest is my patients. And I need to have them do well. And sometimes having a visioning process allows us to look beyond ourselves and to look beyond parochial approaches, and then ultimately, as we do that, then innovation happens.
GRAPHIC SLIDE: Collaboration
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Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.
Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D.: The vision of the whole group was that we need to be more collaborative, we need to understand what others are doing next to us. And then with that added information and with that added collaboration, we can be a lot more effective.
Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco"
Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D.: I think what made this really special is that we had a broad constituency from behavioral scientists, clinical researchers, basic researchers, translational researchers, some bioethicists—who all had the same goal to work together to promote a vision for the future of reproductive research in this country.
Teresa K. Woodruff, Ph.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "Teresa K. Woodruff, Ph.D., Northwestern University"
Teresa K. Woodruff, Ph.D.: It was an exciting opportunity as a basic scientist to be a part of this early level of thinking about what the opportunities are for the next ten years and reproductive health, and in particular for me, women’s reproductive health. It’s not often that we’re invited in to the table at the very beginning, and here we are, and so I was very excited to participate. And one of the things I really enjoy is hearing the perspectives of people that I don’t ordinarily interact with. So this workshop actually, in and of itself, created a nucleus of people that I think can become catalytic in executing the vision as it’s rolled out over the next several years.
John Chae, M.D. talks on camera in a conference setting. John Chae, M.D.: I was also excited about the community. There was a sense that we can really work with each other. We can actually speak your language, our language. That people were willing to be ambassadors from where they were to a different specialty, if you will; and by doing that we have a diversity of people, which means diversity of ideas, which means innovation, which means progress.
GRAPHIC TITLE: Communication
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David R. McClay, Ph.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "David R. McClay, Ph.D., Duke University on camera"
David R. McClay, Ph.D.: The kinds of science we do is becoming so diverse, that we need to have communication, conversations, and to bring people together so we can integrate all this information, and so I thought this would be an opportunity to help facilitate that.
Paul Jacob Turek, M.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "Paul Jacob Turek, M.D., The Turek Clinic on camera"
Paul Jacob Turek, M.D.: There was a deep excitement to change what we’re doing. There was a deep excitement for better communication with the public. They are paying for this, and we need to serve them.
GRAPHIC TITLE: Education and Translation
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Ida Chow, Ph.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "Ida Chow, Ph.D., Society for Developmental Biology on camera"
Ida Chow, Ph.D.: We need to provide the right conditions for the students to get interested and excited about not only about developmental biology, but science in general and come up with good ideas and use the technology and advance.
Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D. talks on camera in a conference setting. Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D.: I think this is a great opportunity to not only provide a vision for the science and the translation to clinical medicine, but also really to underscore how important it is to train the next generation in a more broad and multidisciplinary way than, say, my generation was trained.
Kristin K. Baldwin, Ph.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "Kristin K. Baldwin, Ph.D., The Scripps Research Institute"
Kristin K. Baldwin, Ph.D.: We have an opportunity now because of the tools that have come out that allow you to do work on almost anything; we now have an opportunity to expect people to have a broad research area and a broad research strategy and to reward people for that. And I think that will help advance science.
Pamela W. Duncan, PT, Ph.D. talks on camera in a conference setting.

Text appears at bottom of screen that reads: "Pamela W. Duncan, PT, Ph.D., Duke University"
Pamela W. Duncan, PT, Ph.D.: There are also some very innovative, promising therapies that will make an impact. And in order to be effective and translate these to better patient care, we’ve got to have a community of scientists to do it, all talking together with a large vision and most importantly a large heart.
GRAPHIC TITLE/URL: www.nichd.gov/vision [MUSIC OUT]
Last Updated Date: 09/21/2011
Last Reviewed Date: 09/21/2011
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